Thursday, March 5, 2009

Operation New Fences

Six months ago, Hurricane Ike hit rural Southeast Texas devastating communities and agricultural lands. Today, Texans have a chance to help farmers and ranchers rebuild the homes, ranches and lives devastated by the storm.


You can lend a hand to your fellow Texans by donating supplies or volunteering your time through our latest relief effort: "Operation New Fences." Ranchers lost an estimated 4,800 cows and 5,600 calves in the storm surge of Hurricane Ike. Those cattle can’t be replaced until new fences are built.


I urge you to help these hard-working Texans in their time of need. Click HERE if you need help, or if you would like to assist in rebuilding the 1,700 miles of destroyed fence line in Chambers, Galveston, Liberty, Orange and Jefferson counties.


I would like to thank Texas AgriLife Extension and the Fellowship of Christian Farmers International for helping make this effort possible.


Read some of my past blog posts on Hurricane Ike:

Dec. 17, 2008- Funds Available for Texas Farmers and Ranchers Recovering from Hurricane Ike

Dec.9, 2008- Documentary Highlights Texan Teamwork after Hurricane Ike

Oct 27, 2008- Testimony Before Senate Committees on Hurricane Ike

Sept. 23, 2008- Aerial Tour With Houston Astros Player Carlos Lee

Sept. 22, 2008- Slideshow From Aerial Tour of Hurricane Ike

Sept. 20, 2008- Texans Answer the Call for Assistance

Sept. 17, 2008-Aerial Tour of Areas Devastated by Hurricane Ike

Sept. 16, 2008- Update on Hurricane Ike Help for Texas Farmers and Ranchers

Sept. 15, 2008- Texans Need Your Help After Hurricane Ike Strands Livestock

2 comments:

Gill said...

These hurricanes cause major damage to farmers, and farmers find it really hard to recover from the situation. SO i think the government must help the farmers by releasing funds. I think the government must do something about this. Thanks for posting about this topic.

My URL-
http://www.agri4b.com/

dykstra0496 said...

I feel sorry for the farmers hit by hurricane Ike, but it brings up the question: “Should livestock be kept in places prone to flooding?” People can get out of the way when a hurricane is in the Gulf, but animals -entrusted to ranchers- is often left to fight for themselves. At a minimum, ranchers should provide a means of escape to higher grounds (or build a mound) so their animals won’t die a horrible death.